No Rain

In South Dakota we see rain as a necessary thing to help crops grow – as long as it comes at the right time, not too much, not too little, etc. Here on the trail it means different things – like the unreliable water sources may be running. Some will eventually dry up later. Here is the day in a life of a hiker in the rain:

Rain means you will be soaking wet and unless you have dry bags and a good pack cover you may also be carrying a swimming pool. My shoes/socks have been totally squishy, but I haven’t been able to dump water out of my boots yet. I am sure that day will come.

flowers on the trail

A lot of flowers will be knocked off the bushes and it looks like a flower girl went down the trail before you.

Because there are mostly ups and downs you are either walking upstream or downstream in the water. Any flat ground becomes puddles. You can try to avoid the puddles, but it doesn’t take long to realize you might as well tramp through them while singing ‘singing in the rain’. Everything is slippery when wet – the rocks and roots can be trecherous. Of course the mud makes things fun as well.

As stated in the previous post my boots, when wet, cause me blisters on the tops of my toes. Not fun. It takes my boots about 2 days to dry out and they smell even better wet!

It’s best just to keep hiking in wet stuff and get dry once in camp. This means long johns for me. Wet clothes mean cold and it’s important to get warm ASAP after getting into camp. The really fun part is putting on wet clothes in the morning! Your body heat dries them out or you keep your camp clothes dry at least. I try to keep a pair of dry socks at all times in case it gets really cold.

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About Renee

I enjoy adventures. Whether running marathons, thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail, working with Service Adventure, or working with youth as Program Director of Swan Lake Christian Camp for 9 years, I have encountered many an adventure. On this site I will try to capture the big and small ones for you. Enjoy!

Posted on May 31, 2012, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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